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Scouse

 

There is a school of thought that in order to eat well in Britain, you have to eat three breakfasts a day. Here I introduce you to some genuine British cooking the dish known as Scouse. Basically we are talking about stew, so the recipe can be customized at will, the information below is just a rough outline. Arguments over which meat or vegetables should rightfully be included are common.

 

Basic Ingredients

 

Beef or Lamb or Mince (can be omitted by vegetarians)

OXO Cube(s), or veggie stock cubes, as appropriate

Onion

Potatoes

Carrots

Salt and Pepper to taste (One instruction I have read : Salt to taste, and twice as much black pepper as you would think prudent)

 

Other options as desired : Tomatoes (or tomato sauce), cabbage, mustard, mixed herbs or parsley), yeast extract, Worcester Sauce, HP Sauce, any vegetable or appropriate leftovers, corned beef , curry powder (for curried version obviously), (even crushed garlic, sherry though genuine scousers would be unlikely to do anything so poncy)

 

BASIC DIRECTIONS

 

  1. Put your favourite Beatles album on your stereo

 

  1. Boil the potatoes

 

  1. Never measure the ingredients simply put the whole lot in a pot, squash the potatoes up a bit to produce a squidgy texture (eventually), cover with water, then cover with lid and cook in oven for between 1 hour and 2 hours. Stir every so often and top up with water when appropriate.

 

Serve with beetroot or red cabbage.

 

I could introduce two related dishes Irish Stew and Lancashire Hot Pot. Essentially the only difference is the shape of the potatoes, although this has the effect of changing the taste considerably (honest). I have emphasised that in Scouse, the potatoes need to be squidged up. If you avoid this step and just insert the potatoes whole or halved etc. into the stew (and maybe use some pearl barley as an ingredient) then you end up with Irish Stew (or what I call Irish Stew, anyway). To make Hot Pot, you need to slice the potatoes, and it is also important to form a layer of these slices on top of the stew, covering it completely.